TESOL TEFL Reviews - Video Testimonial - Amber

 

Amber took the four-week in-class course in Buenos Aires because she was looking for a new challenge. Teaching English abroad will enable her to travel the world and gain new experiences at the same time. In this TEFL review, she says how much she enjoyed her month-long stay at the center in Buenos Aires and especially enjoyed teaching adults. She is excited to start her first teaching position.


Below you can read feedback from an ITTT graduate regarding one section of their online TEFL certification course. Each of our online courses is broken down into concise units that focus on specific areas of English language teaching. This convenient, highly structured design means that you can quickly get to grips with each section before moving onto the next.

CONDITIONAL Conditional tenses are used to speculate about what could happen, what might have happened, and what we wish would happen. In English, most sentences using the conditional contain the word if. Many conditional forms in English are used in sentences that include verbs in one of the past tenses. This usage is referred to as \"the unreal past\" because we use a past tense but we are not actually referring to something that happened in the past. There are five main ways of constructing conditional sentences in English. In all cases, these sentences are made up of an if clause and a main clause. In many negative conditional sentences, there is an equivalent sentence construction using \"unless\" instead of \"if\". Conditional sentence type Usage If clause verb tense Main clause verb tense Zero General truths Simple present Simple present Type 1 A possible condition and its probable result Simple present Simple future Type 2 A hypothetical condition and its probable result Simple past Present conditional or Present continuous conditional Type 3 An unreal past condition and its probable result in the past Past perfect Perfect conditional Mixed type An unreal past condition and its probable result in the present Past perfect Present contditional THE ZERO CONDITIONAL The zero conditional is used for when the time being referred to is now or always and the situation is real and possible. The zero conditional is often used to refer to general truths. The tense in both parts of the sentence is the simple present. In zero conditional sentences, the word \"if\" can usually be replaced by the word \"when\" without changing the meaning. If clause Main clause If + simple present simple present If this thing happens that thing happens. If you heat ice it melts. If it rains the grass gets wet. TYPE 1 CONDITIONAL The type 1 conditional is used to refer to the present or future where the situation is real. The type 1 conditional refers to a possible condition and its probable result. In these sentences the if clause is in the simple present, and the main clause is in the simple future. If clause Main clause If + simple present simple future If this thing happens that thing will happen. If you don't hurry you will miss the train. If it rains today you will get wet. TYPE 2 CONDITIONAL The type 2 conditional is used to refer to a time that is now or any time, and a situation that is unreal. These sentences are not based on fact. The type 2 conditional is used to refer to a hypothetical condition and its probable result. In type 2 conditional sentences, the if clause uses the simple past, and the main clause uses the present conditional. If clause Main clause If + simple past present conditional or present continuous conditional If this thing happened that thing would happen. (but I'm not sure this thing will happen) OR that thing would be happening. If you went to bed earlier you would not be so tired. If it rained you would get wet. If I spoke Italian I would be working in Italy. TYPE 3 CONDITIONAL The type 3 conditional is used to refer to a time that is in the past, and a situation that is contrary to reality. The facts they are based on are the opposite of what is expressed. The type 3 conditional is used to refer to an unreal past condition and its probable past result. In type 3 conditional sentences, the if clause uses the past perfect, and the main clause uses the perfect conditional. If clause Main clause If + past perfect perfect conditional or perfect continuous conditional If this thing had happened that thing would have happened. (but neither of those things really happened) OR that thing would have been happening. If you had studied harder you would have passed the exam. If it had rained you would have gotten wet. If I had accepted that promotion I would have been working in Milan. MIXED TYPE CONDITIONAL The mixed type conditional is used to refer to a time that is in the past, and a situation that is ongoing into the present. The facts they are based on are the opposite of what is expressed. The mixed type conditional is used to refer to an unreal past condition and its probable result in the present. In mixed type conditional sentences, the if clause uses the past perfect, and the main clause uses the present conditional. If clause Main clause If + past perfect or simple past present conditional or perfect conditional If this thing had happened that thing would happen. (but this thing didn't happen so that thing isn't happening) If I had worked harder at school I would have a better job now. If we had looked at the map we wouldn't be lost. If you weren't afraid of spiders you would have picked it up and put it outside. Reported speech When we report someone?s words we can do it in two ways. We can use direct speech with quotation marks (?I work in a bank?), or we can use reported speech (He said he worked in a bank.)??In reported speech the tenses, word-order and pronouns may be different from those in the original sentence.??Present simple and present continuous tenses * Direct speech: ?I travel a lot in my job? Reported speech: He said that he travelled a lot in his job. The present simple tense (I travel) usually changes to the past simple (he travelled) in reported speech. * Direct speech: ?Be quiet. The baby?s sleeping.? Reported speech: She told me to be quiet because the baby was sleeping. The present continuous usually changes to the past continuous.??NB: * ?I work in Italy? Reported speech: He told me that he works in Italy. It isn?t always necessary to change the tense. If something is still true now ? he still works in Italy ? we can use the present simple in the reported sentence.??Past simple and past continuous tenses * Direct speech: ?We lived in China for 5 years.? Reported speech: She told me they had lived in China for 5 years. The past simple tense (we lived) usually changes to the past perfect (they had lived) in reported speech. * Direct speech: ?I was walking down the road when I saw the accident.? Reported speech: He told me he?d been walking down the road when he?d seen the accident. The past continuous usually changes to the past perfect continuous.??Perfect tenses * Direct speech: ?They?ve always been very kind to me?. Reported speech: She said they?d always been very kind to her. The present perfect tense (have always been) usually changes to the past perfect tense (had always been). * Direct speech: ?They had already eaten when I arrived? Reported speech: He said they?d already eaten when he?d arrived. The past perfect tense does not change in reported speech.??You can find more information about reported speech in another section.  

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